3Ci has noticed a heightened interest in recent years by both individuals and businesses inquiring about adjustments that could be made to Facebook’s privacy settings. Our online reputation management team frequently finds negative social media content that clients didn’t realize was so easily accessible. Often this content is on the client’s own social media pages.

Acknowledging situations such as these, Facebook is making major adjustments to its privacy features, providing users the ability to once again take control of their own pages. New features include:

  • Photo removal tool: The most significant exposure to a person’s online reputation can be photos that reveal too much. Photos of college parties or “over-served” nights with friends can destroy a person’s chances at landing a job or promotion. Ex-spouses, jealous family and former friends and simple unflattering pictures can all cause embarrassment. This photo removal tool allows a user to ask Facebook to remove all public evidence of such images, hiding them forever.
  • App permissions: Instead of subjecting users to a long, drawn-out explanation of everything accessible to a particular app when signing up for it, apps will now only alert users to privacy warnings as they are applicable. Facebook warns that this might not be exact among all applications, for instance with games not participating in the new changes.
  • Easier-to-understand settings: Many have long complained that Facebook’s privacy settings can be convoluted and daunting. Facebook will now simplify these settings so users will know what they are getting with each choice. Shortcuts will take users to the most commonly-changed settings to prevent them from wasting valuable minutes trying to find the item they need to change.
  • Activity log: This one has been around since last year, and allows users to easily see which items are showing up on the timeline and which aren’t. The “View As” drop-down box lets users see their pages as various users are, with the default showing the page as the general public sees it.

3Ci obviously recognizes the importance of keeping a person’s online reputation maintained and managed. With these new privacy features, users are empowered to take control of what other people are seeing, allowing them to show only what they want to show.

The changes are expected to be rolled out in the coming weeks, with Facebook placing alerts on users’ pages to let them know about the changes. With these new changes, Facebook hopes to earn back consumers’ trust. A trust that has been eroded due to aggressive encroachment in to the private lives of its users.